Tag Archives: Ukraine

Eastern and Southern Ukraine spearhead Ukraine’s wind energy potential: one of the highest in Europe

In the last 30 years, renewable energy sources like wind, geothermal, solar have been responsible for production of almost 93% of Costa Rica’s energy.

Renewables in Europe stand at the following percentage point:

Croatia 29%

Portugal 28%

EU average 16,7%

Sweden 15%

Germany 15%

Ukraine 1,2%

Ukraine’s wind energy potential is one of the highest in Europe.

German technology-based Furlander Windtechnology in Kramatorsk assembles 3.2 МW wind turbines and is  the only such manufacturer in the Commonwealth of Independent States that formed during the dissolution of the Soviet Union. A wind turbine this powerful can supply enough energy to a village of 2,000-3,000 people.

Furlander Windtechnology in Kramatorsk has the annual production capacity of 100 turbines. One of its recent clients was a wind farm in Kazakhstan.

To the south-west, Rinat Akhmetov’s DTEK Windpower-owned Botiyevska wind farm sports an installed capacity of 200 MW and is the largest wind farm in Ukraine. Located on the Sea of Azov  shore in Zaporizhia oblast, it is one of the five largest on-shore wind farms in Central and Eastern Europe.

With its 65 Dutch-made 3.075 МW, 400 ton Vestas turbines, Botiyevska generated in 2016  600 million kW/h of energy — enough to supply a 100,000-strong community.

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R&S Quantum: there will be as many electric vehicle chargers as gas station pumps

Lifecycle ownership costs of an electric vehicle are 1/10th of an internal combustion equivalent.

GREAT. What’s next?

Across the planet, companies involved in the EV charging industry “still have a lot of questions about what kind of charging, and what levels, will prove to be the most cost-effective.”

Oleh Martychenko of R&S Quantum, a Ukrainian  fast EV charger manufacturer, estimates that as many electric vehicle chargers will at some stage be deployed in the world as the number of gas station pumps today. Mr Martychenko is also an M&A expert.

Oleh
Oleh Martychenko of R&S Quantum, a Ukraine-based manufacturer of fast chargers for electric vehicles

Before that happens, as an EV charging station operator/service provider at peak hours should you aim for a max 5 min charge and max three vehicles in the line before each charging port? Or is it already bordering on the risk of scaring loyalty out of EV drivings customers?

To learn more go to R&S Quantum.

Africa’s film markets and video content distribution trends (1/2)

by Andy Kozlov (@KozlovAndy)

It’s not a film unless it has a distribution plan.

How about a multi-decade distribution deal?

Distributors are in the game to profit from films that are easy to sell, not to nurture filmmakers. By this logic apparently, an independent film will languish on the shelf indefinitely if it is not marketable.

The same will be true for most of you aspiring TV producers.

Get into the habit of attending African content markets

So where do you look to make yourself marketable? Experience shows, attending content markets is a must. And every month you can be part of one or even a bunch of them, depending on the season.

As you do that, make sure you get to know your buyers’, co-producers’ needs, address their concerns in the bud. In a nutshell — be love-able.

Get both global and local in your narrative. Avoid contrived situations — they suck

Some TV format ideas can make you super famous  more than others. But the general trend is for your narrative to be both global and local at the same time. As Wangeci Murage, managing partner at Nairobi, Kenya-based Media Pros Africa, explains commenting on Russell Southwood’s Netflix in Africa – Three reasons why it will not conquer everything any time soon:

Netflix do acquire content but their main aim is to build their inventory through original productions. Their [January 2016] entry into the “world” market signals an upsurge in local content production, to which they will own full rights.

Content developers have also started shifting their mindset and have began producing content with global appeal and local relevance. This is true of the four African countries [mentioned by Mr Southwood in descending order they are Nigeria, South Africa, Ghana and Kenya;] so they will find a market.

Russell Southwood is the CEO of Balancing Act, a consultancy and research company focused on telecoms, internet and broadcast in Africa. He is one of those people you can often run into at media markets across Africa.

Speaking of South African film industry, veteran producer Jeremy Nathan estimated in May 2012: we are making 25 to 30 films a year now which is really very impressive. Ten years ago we were only making five or six films a year.

And as Balancing Act points out:

There are currently some 136 VoD platforms in Africa, both local, regional and international.

Outside Africa, Thema TV was the first provider of ethnic TV channels in Europe, particularly in France, with the successful launch of “The African Bouquet“, “The German Bouquet” and the “Indian Ocean Bouquet”.

In Africa, take M-Net, the Naspers-owned terrestrial pay TV channel. In 2008, M-Net’s AfricaMagic, one of the leading channels on the DStv bouquet,  launched Africa Magic Plus the growth of which further prompted a flowering of additional channels that catered for culture and language-specific African communities, inclusive of Yoruba, Hausa and Swahili speaking groups.

In 2013, in Africa there were some 535 local TV channels, each responsible for the transmission of up to 1,000 hours of fresh programs annually.

So on the one hand, the distribution channels are expanding. But so does competition from other African content producers. Mind you, even Ukraine in Eastern Europe now shoots Nollywood films. However that also means that Zimbabwean film distributors get to network with their Slav peers at the likes of Kiev Media Week.

As of 2013, African content production ranged from 3-4,000 hours per year. During the 1990s, this figure was lower than 100.

For African content producers concerned about growing competition, Media Pros Africa’s Wangeci Murage paints a picture as bright as it can probably get in the world of unkown unkowns:

This is an age-old phenomenon that is much welcome in our industry. The likes of DSTV’s Showmax and Buni TV would not be in existence if it wasn’t for forward thinkers such as IROKO TV. They saw a gap and went out to fill it. There may be a few holes in the service delivery but nonetheless, they serve a majority of African and International markets in search of Nollywood content.

€3,000 to 30,000 checks handed directly to directors and producers at the Marché International du Cinéma Africain in Ouagadougou undoubtedly makes a good news story.

But this is where those of you who prefer to think long-term should ask themselves:

Is it worth giving away the exclusivity rights on any broadcast on the African continent for a quarter of a century ?

Whatever your decision is, you also want to avoid becoming totally dependent on the international festival circuit for the distribution of your content.

In Tanzania they say 70% of the population do not have access to TV.  If you feel passionate about reaching out to the rural folks who are underserved by cinemas, have limited mobile internet access (2G?); if you feel like you are called to bridge the gap between indigenous people, rural and urban Africans, consider going it alone. Well..not totally alone:

The global list of your outdoor movie partners is growing like never before

FilmAid International  is committed to a participatory approach, teaching skills and involving local communities with the media making process.

Open Air Cinema with its world’s premiere outdoor cinema systems and inflatable movie screens

Short & Sweet with its largest inflatable screen in South Africa

Sunshine Cinema is a mobile cinema that converts solar power to social impact. Through various short films, facilitated workshops and “how to” videos they address social and environmental challenges through community facilitated engagement.

Cine Vagabundo (The Wandering Cinema), a Colombian non-profit that has recognized the fact that with only 5% of cities and townships that have cinemas, the Latin American nation is not an exception, that something needs to be done to link content producers with their digitally divided audiences on a global scale. And locally — glocally.

The author can be reached on andreakozlov@gmail.com

These TV format ideas can make you super famous. Earn money by making friends, as you travel the world

In our previous post we spoke about various content markets that you can visit to network with media execs and promote your work.
Many of these events have pitching sessions where the rookies are encouraged to present their content ideas.

 

From global pleasure of sex and procreation, broadcast by TV5 Québec Canada, to extraordinary schools around the world.
Look at the world with Brazilian eyes.
Global Ukrainians, global elites in island nations, MTB culture and smart cities in Africa or underexplored but vibrant transportation hubs in your region.
Even Customs and Border Secirity forces. The world of TV is teeming with under-developed narrative opportunities. Grab your pen, stylus or smartphone. Take notes. Create!
Travel the world, re-invest, make friends, educate the world!